Why Do We Celebrate American Independence Day on the Fourth of July Every Year with Children Festivities and Fireworks?

/ July 4, 2019

It happened in 1776.  We think of July 4, 1776, as a day that represents the Declaration of Independence and the birth of the United States of America as an independent nation.

“with pomp, parade….bonfires and illuminations from one end of this continent to the other.”

happy 4th of july unicorn style4th of July Celebrations include festivities bringing families, friends and children together such as parades, themed events, BBQ’s, carnivals, games, and the ultimate fireworks shows in many cities. 

The Continental Congress declared that the thirteen American colonies were no longer subject to the monarch of Britain and were now united, free, and independent states.

Describe July 4th as our nation’s birthday as you teach your children, “Tell them the parade, fireworks and hot dogs are for the celebration….as children get older, they can begin to understand what independence means,” says Mary Eames Ucci, education director of the Wellesley College Child Study Center. “When you become independent, you get a lot of freedom but you also get a lot of responsibility.”

Make it an annual ritual for kids spend a few minutes thinking about and then discussing the contributions they want to make to their country — and to the world, said Debra Condren, a psychologist and mom.

“Help them come up with age-appropriate ideas for short-term, intermediate and long-term ways they can give back to and carry on the cause championed by those courageous leaders who originally fought for our independence,” she said.

Make it an annual ritual for kids spend a few minutes thinking about and then discussing the contributions they want to make to their country — and to the world, said Debra Condren, a psychologist and mom.

“Help them come up with age-appropriate ideas for short-term, intermediate and long-term ways they can give back to and carry on the cause championed by those courageous leaders who originally fought for our independence,” she said.

DID YOU KNOW?

We think of July 4, 1776, as a day that represents the Declaration of Independence and the birth of the United States of America as an independent nation.   However, July 4, 1776 wasn’t the official day that the Continental Congress decided to declare independence, it happened on July 2, 1776.

WHY FIREWORKS?

Early U.S. settlers brought their love of fireworks with them to the New World and fireworks were part of the very first Independence Day – a tradition that continues every Independence Day when Americans celebrate as John Adams had hoped “with pomp, parade….bonfires and illuminations from one end of this continent to the other.”

 

Sources: Wikipedia, Today Show

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